No Such Thing As Too Much Fandom

at least not very often

46,634 notes

youdrankmygingerale:

official-mens-frights-activist:

lastlips:

THIS.

this is a constant battledo I genuinely prefer how my legs look/feel shaved or have i just been conditioned to prefer it?do miniskirts and thigh high socks only make me feel more confident because i know men find me more attractive in them?how can i tell? is there even a way to tell at this point?

On the opposite end of the spectrum, do conscious people actually prefer the opposite of these societal conditionings or do they just fall in love with the subversion behind it?
Every aspect of human nature is socially conditioned. Even those aspects which seem counter to our society.

youdrankmygingerale:

official-mens-frights-activist:

lastlips:

THIS.

this is a constant battle

do I genuinely prefer how my legs look/feel shaved or have i just been conditioned to prefer it?

do miniskirts and thigh high socks only make me feel more confident because i know men find me more attractive in them?

how can i tell? is there even a way to tell at this point?

On the opposite end of the spectrum, do conscious people actually prefer the opposite of these societal conditionings or do they just fall in love with the subversion behind it?

Every aspect of human nature is socially conditioned. Even those aspects which seem counter to our society.

(Source: fatgirlinohio, via iwannalaughallyourtearsaway)

Filed under interesting questions I feel like the second person is perhaps missing the trait of laziness which also impacts my life a great deal.... feminism beauty culture

12,040 notes

Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)

This makes me laugh every time I see it.

(via thegreatgodum)

(I wonder how many of those women were, ya know, Bisexual and Pansexual. We’re often erased. BUT, this is a fantastic story all the same.)

(via fandomsandfeminism)

Filed under wowwww women's history lgbtqia history

7,976 notes

When 12-year-old girls are watching something like the CW’s long-running campy drama One Tree Hill (which aired from 2003-2012), in which actors like 25-year-old Hilarie Burton played 17-year-old cheerleader Peyton Sawyer, they’re not seeing an accurate portrayal of their future on screen. They’re seeing a glamorized vision of some executive’s idealized version of high school instead. When a real 16-year-old cheerleader flips on the CW and sees fellow pompom shakers who look like Burton or costar Sophia Bush, also well beyond her high school years, they’re looking at themselves at wondering why they don’t look like that in their uniform. Here’s the secret: they didn’t when they were 16, either.

Samantha Wilson, Why Teenagers Need to Play Teenagers On Screen (via thunderboltandlightning)

Aka the thesis of my entire tumblr.

(via knitmeapony)

(via strangerinsidethetardis)

Filed under so true I don't necessarily want to put a lot of teenagers in that industry but I don't want what we have either